Human Rights Equality Puzzle – Asian Heritage Month

The Mainland Human Rights Committee will recognize Equality Days throughout the year with an electronic and interactive Human Rights Equality Puzzle.  Each puzzle piece will represent a different day or month that is recognized in Canada and/or internationally.  We invite you to check back throughout the year to learn about these important dates and for the unveiling of the puzzle picture on April 17, 2022.

Click on a puzzle piece!

MHRC Human Rights Equality Puzzle

MHRC Human Rights Equality Puzzle
April 17th - the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms May - Asian Heritage Month May 5 - National  Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls May 15 - International Day of Families May 17 - International day against homophobia, transphobia, and biphobia June - Pride Month June - National Indigenous History Month June 21 - National Indigenous Peoples Day June 27 - Multiculturalism Day August 9 - International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples September 6 - Labour Day September 10

April 17th - the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Each April 17th we celebrate Canada’s Equality Day, the anniversary of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which came into effect on April 17, 1985. Read the Charter.

May - Asian Heritage Month

Each May we celebrate Asian Heritage Month. Please go to the following links to learn more about why we recognize this month and how you can celebrate it in your home.

May 5 - National  Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

May 5th has been designated as the National  Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to honour those whose lives have been tragically cut short by violence.

Indigenous women in Canada are seven times more likely to be murdered by serial killers than non-Indigenous women.  Click here to learn more about about the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

If you would like to raise awareness about this date, please consider doing any of the following:

1)    Wear RED on May 5th and post a photo on social media with the hashtag #NationalDayofAwareness #MMIWG or #MMIW

2)    Host a virtual event to honour this day

3)    Create a living memorial

REDress

May 15 - International Day of Families

May 15th is International Day of Families, a date designated to promote awareness of issues relating to families and to increase the knowledge of the social, economic and demographic processes affecting families.

Far too often we do not see ourselves reflected in what is considered the gold standard example of families: PSAC and the Mainland Human Rights Committee wants to change that by spending the year celebrating you and your family.  

Same-sex parent households, single parents, parents to fur-babies - you get to define what makes your family a family.

All PSAC members are encouraged to send in your pictures or videos of your family to braggp@psac-afpc.com and tell us what makes your family so wonderful so that all of us in your union family can celebrate them too.

May 17 - International day against homophobia, transphobia, and biphobia

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia (IDAHOT) marks the date in 1990 when the World Health Organization removed homosexuality from its list of mental disorders.

IDAHOT aims to coordinate international events that raise awareness of LGBTQ2+ rights violations and stimulate interest in LGBTQ2+ rights work worldwide.

The International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia is not one centralized campaign; rather it is a moment that everyone can take advantage of to take action on queer rights.

Emily Craddock  (she/her)

PSAC BC Regional Council LGBTQ2+ Rep

June - Pride Month

June is Pride Month and also marks the start of the Pride season of festivals and celebrations held across the country and around the world.  Pride celebrates the LGBTQ2+ communities, acknowledges their history and achievements, and supports their rights and recognition that they deserve.

How to celebrate Pride virtually:

  • Learn about the history of Pride in Canada
  • Host a virtual happy hour with your friends, family, or even your union family.
  • Support locallyl owned LGBTQ2+ businesses.
  • Donate to LGBTQ2+ organizations within your community.
  • Host a virtual LGBTQ2+ film festival with your friends and loved ones.
  • Attend virtual events, such as a Drag Queen Storytime.

June - National Indigenous History Month

National Indigenous History Month

Each June Canadians celebrate National Indigenous History Month to honour the history, heritage, and diversity of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

We encourage you to set aside some time this month to learn, share, and celebrate their varied traditions and cultures, their stories, and their important contributions to the history of this country.

June 21 - National Indigenous Peoples Day

This June 21st we celebrate the 25th anniversary of National Indigenous Peoples Day!

Here are some ideas as to how you can virtually celebrate the  the rich, varied, and beautiful heritage, cultures and achievements of the First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people:

  • Watch Indigenous films and/or documentaries.
  • Listen to music, read a book, enjoy artwork by Indigenous artists.
  • Visit a museum collection of Indgenous art and artifacts online.
  • Participate in one of the virtual events in your community
  • Familiarize yourself with the 94 Calls to Action and make a personal pledge of reconciliation.

June 27 - Multiculturalism Day

Each June 27th we celebrate Multiculturalism Day, however this year is especially noteworthy because it is a milestone year.

The 50th anniversary of the Multiculturalism Policy

In 1971, Canada is the first country in the world to adopt multiculturalism as an official policy, intending to preserve the cultural freedom of all individuals and provide recognition of the cultural contributions of diverse ethnic groups to Canadian society. For many years following this initial action, multicultural policies do not meet the needs of all immigrants to Canada, but the introduction of the term brings attention to the need for federal coordination to reflect the diversity of Canadian society. (Source: Library and Archives Canada)

August 9 - International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

August 9 commemorates the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. It is celebrated around the world and marks the date of the inaugural session of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations at the United Nations in 1982. 

The 2021 commemoration of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples focuses on the theme “Leaving no one behind: Indigenous peoples and the call for a new social contract.” This year's commemoration features an interactive discussion on the distinct elements to be considered when building and redesigning a new social contract that is inclusive of Indigenous peoples—where Indigenous peoples’ own forms of governance and ways of life must be respected and based on their free, prior, and informed consent and genuine and inclusive participation and partnership. 

The guest speakers will be James Anaya, who has taught and written extensively on international human rights and issues concerning Indigenous peoples, and María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés, an Ecuadorian scholar and diplomat who has held many leadership positions within the government of Ecuador, serving as minister of foreign affairs, minister of defense, and minister of cultural and natural heritage.

For more information about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, visit https://www.un.org/en/observances/indigenous-day.

(Source: languagemagazine.com)

September 6 - Labour Day

Labour Day has been marked as a statutory public holiday in Canada on the first Monday in September since 1894. However, the origins of Labour Day in Canada can be traced back to numerous local demonstrations and celebrations in earlier decades.Such events assumed political significance in 1872, when an April labour demonstration in Toronto, in support of striking printers, led directly to the enactment of the Trade Unions Act, a law that confirmed the legality of unions.

 

September 10

World Suicide Prevention Day is recognized annually on September 10th by over 50 countries.  The day offers people the opportunity to gain a greater awareness and understanding about suicide, 

The Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention has put together a WSPD 2021 Toolkit with the goal of starting a movement of preventative action and in support of this year’s theme: Creating Hope Through Action.

The Department of National Defence provides information to further our knowledge on Suicide and Suicide Prevention in the Canadian Armed Forces. 

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) has recently released Suicide Prevention in the Workplaceto help people to navigate through difficult conversations surrounding suicide, while providing tips for protecting the mental health of managers and employees. Also, they have worked collaboratively with the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention, the Centre for Suicide Prevention and the Public Health Agency of Canadato develop Suicide Prevention Toolkits to support people who have been impacted by suicide.

If you are experiencing significant distress and feel you are not coping well, you may need additional support from a mental health professional or other health care professional. If you or someone you know is in crisis, call 911 or visit an emergency department. 

It is important you seek support if you need assistance.  Other resources include the following:

(Sources:  suicideprevention.ca and canada.ca)

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